Opera as Institution: Networks and Professions (1700 – 1914)

November 23 – 24 2018, Department of Musicology, University of Graz

An international conference organized jointly by the Universities of Graz and Salzburg

Conference Board:

  • Daniel Brandenburg (University of Salzburg)
  • Cristina Scuderi (University of Graz)
  • Michael Walter (University of Graz)
  • Ingeborg Zechner (University of Salzburg)

The performance of opera as musical genre demands specific institutional surroundings in order to provide the means for scenic and musical representation. Indeed, operatic history, ranging from its beginnings in seventeenth-century Venice to today’s globalized opera industry, is intimately bound up with the history of institutions.

This conference aims to gather internationally renowned musicologists whose research focuses on the institutional histories of European opera from the eighteenth to the end of the "long nineteenth century". The intention of the conference is not to understand operatic institutions as locally distinct and isolated organizations, but rather perceive them as part of a transnational operatic network.

The specific design of the conference seeks to bring historical developments and shifts into account, and will lead to a deeper understanding of transnational operatic practices throughout the centuries. In addition, it will facilitate an international scholarly exchange on a complex and multifaceted topic in music history.

Conference papers will cover French, Italian, English and German operatic institutions in Europe from the eighteenth to the "long nineteenth century" and address topics such as:

  • Production systems of French, Italian, English and German opera
  • Political, legal, economic and sociocultural surroundings influencing the institution of the opera and its international exchange
  • Professions in the business of opera (composers, singers, agents, impresari, orchestra musicians, dancers, stage designers, librettists, …)
  • Networks of exchange between operatic institutions and their protagonists

Participation in the conference is free of charge. No advance registration is required for those merely attending.

 
 

Conference Schedule

The information contained in the following schedule will be regularly updated.

Friday, November 23rd 2018
9:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. Opening by Michael Walter, Dean of the Faculty of Humanities, University of Graz

9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

1st session

Chair: Kordula Knaus

Suzanne Aspden (University of Oxford) ‘Freedom of Movement’? Challenges to Cosmopolitanism in 1720s-30s London
Judit Zsovár (Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna) Farinella at the Viennese Kärntnertortheater, 1730-1732
Daniel Brandenburg (University of Salzburg) Italian Operisti as Cultural Network: Insights and Contexts of the Pirker Correspondence
11:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Coffee break

11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

2nd session

Chair: Susanne Kogler

Solveig Serre (University of Tours) The Académie royale de musique under the Ancien Régime: some elements of a political system
Mark Everist (University of Southampton) The Empire Strikes Back: Parisian Politics, Stage Music and the Second Empire
Clair Rowden (University of Cardiff) The Sopranos, Parisian Style, 1869
1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. Lunch break

2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

3rd session

Chair: Irene Brandenburg

Franco Piperno (University La Sapienza – Rome) «Azione sacra per musica». Freemasonry and the Neapolitan Sacred Dramas Repertory for Lenten Operatic Seasons
Richard Erkens (DHI - Rome) Engaging Italian Opera Singers for the Russian Court in 1734/35: An Insight into the Networks of Agents and Impresarios
5:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Accompanying program
Saturday, November 24th 2018
 
 
 

Accompanying Program

5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Guided tour of the opera house in Graz.
6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Wine reception at the opera house.

The guided tour and the wine reception are free of charge for all conference presenters.

Optional Program

7:30 p.m. – 10:15 p.m. Performance of Il barbiere di Siviglia at the opera house in Graz.
Further information on the performance.

Conference participants will have the opportunity to purchase tickets at reduced prices.

 
 
 

Travel and Accommodation

The conference committee has reserved rooms for the conference participants in the Gasthof Pension zur Steirerstub´n.

The conference venue at the Meerscheinschlößl can be reached most easily by using the bus from the stop Lendplatz (bus 58 in the direction Ragnitz). Please exit the bus at the stop Mozartgasse (fifth stop from Lendplatz). The Meerscheinschlößl is only a short walk across the street from the bus stop.

Please have a look at www.graztourismus.at for further information on the public transport in Graz.

 
 

About

Conference Board

  • Daniel Brandenburg
    University of Salzburg
    Department for Musicology and Dance Studies
    Erzabt-Klotz-Straße 1, A-5020 Salzburg
  • Cristina Scuderi
    University of Graz
    Institute for Musicology
    Mozartgasse 3, A-8010 Graz
    E-mail: cristina [dot] scuderi [at] uni-graz [dot] at
  • Michael Walter
    University of Graz
    Institute for Musicology
    Mozartgasse 3, A-8010 Graz
  • Ingeborg Zechner
    University of Salzburg
    Department for Musicology and Dance Studies
    Erzabt-Klotz-Straße 1, A-5020 Salzburg
    E-mail: ingeborg [dot] zechner [at] sbg [dot] ac [dot] at

Contact

Ingeborg Zechner
University of Salzburg
Department for Musicology and Dance Studies
Erzabt-Klotz-Straße 1, A-5020 Salzburg
Phone: +43 662 8044 4655
E-mail: ingeborg [dot] zechner [at] sbg [dot] ac [dot] at

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Suzanne Aspden
‘Freedom of Movement’? Challenges to Cosmopolitanism in 1720s-30s London

Italian opera in the eighteenth century seems to represent an ideal of cosmopolitanism – part of a pan-European elite culture that therefore facilitated the easy movement of stories and singers across the Continent. But nationalist sentiment was already setting up significant obstacles to that easy cultural commerce – and not only in France. British hostility to Italian opera is well known, of course, but how opera’s practitioners and devotees chose to work around that hostility has not been considered. How both British opera-lovers and European (including British) opera-makers responded to this hostility both personally and institutionally, seeking to navigate a viable course for their genre, is the subject of this paper.

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Daniel Brandenburg
Italian Operisti as Cultural Network: Insights and Contexts of the Pirker Correspondence

In the eighteenth century, Italian opera was present in all parts of Europe, thereby constituting a cultural medium that connected courts and centres of power and commerce from Naples to St Petersburg, including Bologna, Venice, Milan, Vienna, Hamburg, Copenhagen, London and Berlin. The artists, commonly known as “Operisti”, assembled either in cooperatives (travelling ensembles) or were employed individually in changing engagements that substantially contributed to the fact that operas could be performed across Europe due to a well-functioning network and communication system that formed the necessary infrastructure for the successful activity of all those involved in the genesis, production and circulation of opera. The proposed paper aims at examining Italian opera under the aspect of the artists – their network and their respective experiences in biography and profession, especially in the mid-eighteenth century correspondence between the musicians and partners in marriage, Franz and Marianne Pirker.

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Michael Burden
German Opera in London’s Italian Opera House: The season of 1832

Thomas Monck Mason, flautist, composer, and writer of opera, took on London’s Italian Opera House for a season in 1832. His Prospectus of the plan intended to be pursued in the direction of the Italian Opera House and his Programme of the arrangements at the King’s Theatre, were two pamphlets apparently welcomed by the subscribers, and represent the almost forgotten opera season of 1832, which included not only a mixture of French and Italian operas, but the first appearance in London of a German company of performers. The season did not go well, at least financially, and by October 1832, Thomas Monck Mason was declared insolvent with a loss of over £60,000; his name appeared among the bankrupts in November. Mason’s death on 7 October 1889 was marked by a number of obituaries headed ‘A varied life’. This paper will look at Mason’s tenure at the King’s Theatre, considering whether or not he made a focused and careful opera house manager. It will also assess the effect the introduction of the new German opera had on the running of London’s Italian Opera House, and the competition it inspired with the houses that promoted opera in English.

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Richard Erkens
Engaging Italian Opera Singers for the Russian Court in 1734/35: An Insight into the Networks of Agents and Impresarios

During the reign of Anna Ivanovna, the Empress of Russia from 1730 to 1740, Italian opera gained ground at the courts in Moscow and St. Petersburg. After Tommaso Ristori's troupe started performing commedie per musica in 1731, the first Italian seria-company arrived in 1736 (or half a year earlier) when the first opere serie (by Francesco Araja) were staged. The main source concerning the Italian singers engaged by Pietro Mira and Giovanni Dreyer, the court’s commissioners, is Jacob von Stählin’s printed chronicles, Nachrichten von der Musik in Russland (1769). Thanks to new documents found in the private archive of the Florentine Impresario Luca Casimiro degli Albizzi, more information about the company’s composition in late 1734, and the complex communication channels employed when engaging singers and musicians, is now available. Although it is astonishing enough that the Florentine impresario of the Teatro della Pergola was involved in this exchange network, more surprising still is that agents not only in Venice, but also in Bologna, Naples and London, took part in this business. By contextualizing excerpts from Albizzi’s correspondence, this paper refines our knowledge of Italian opera companies abroad, particularly the negotiations of the contract conditions, recruitment strategies, the hardships of travelling, the dependencies on patrons, and the power structures within the social hierarchies of the opera business.

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Mark Everist
The Empire Strikes Back: Parisian Politics, Stage Music and the Second Empire

Although 1806/7 legislation had tried to ensure a neat separation between genre and institution in Parisian stage music (through-composed opera and ballet at the Opéra; serious and comic Italian opera at the Théâtre Italien; comédie-vaudeville at the Gymnase Dramatique, etc.), it had inadvertently laid out a field on which the politics of genre could be played out as agents of all types – managers, librettists, journalists and composers – deployed various forms of artistic power. Through a system of contracts, committees and surveillance, the state provided a framework in which such creative power could flow without serious damage to its prestige. But for the first decade of the Second Empire, from 1854 until the licensing system was abolished in 1864, the Empire took over day-to-day control of the Opéra and its repertory in ways that were without precedent since 1789, and that are today almost completely unknown.

One of the central elements in the relationship between the state and the management of opera houses and theatres were government commissions: tribunals that would advise the minister in question on questions of repertory, personnel, and the relationship between competing opera houses. Usually, these commissions consisted of experts: librettists, managers, censors and so on. Unexplored archives, printed and manuscript material now show how in 1854, Napoléon III agreed to a Commission supérieure permanente … du Théâtre Impérial de l’Opéra; this consisted of the most powerful men in government, who made day-to-decisions about programming and repertory, as well as engaging in musical pamphleteering. They imposed a regime of hyper-conservative works on the Opéra, and promoted operas composed by foreign aristocrats and heads of state, often for the delight of their relatives. They mounted generically-shifted productions of older works by Auber, Bellini and Verdi, and were responsible for the revival of Gluck’s Alceste and the ill-fated production of Wagner’s Tannhäuser.

While the result of this intervention was a stagnation of the Opéra’s repertory for the best part of the decade, beneficiaries were the composers of larger-scale works for the Opéra-Comique, the entire repertory of the Théâtre-Lyrique and the emergence of opérette at Offenbach’s Théâtre des Bouffes-Parisiennes.

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Karin Hallgren
An Opera for everyone? The Royal Opera in Stockholm during the 19th century

The Royal Opera in Stockholm was established 1771 by King Gustav III. From the beginning it was a royal institution, which meant that all decisions on repertoire and performances as well as the responsibility for the financing belonged to the king and the court. During the 19th century, however, it gradually turned into a theatre for the bourgeoisie and, by the century's, there was no longer any connections to the court. This paper will discuss how this change occurred, with special regard to financial circumstances, the practical and artistic basis for the performances, comparing these factors against the broader European backdrop. The study is based on archive material and is inspired by the theoretical perspectives on circulation. The relations to other opera houses, especially in northern Europe, are a main interest of this paper. The repertoire was mainly of international origin and was performed in Stockholm at the same time as in many other countries. It is well known that many of the musicians in the orchestra came from other countries, but a systematic study of the migration of musicians has not been done. By focusing on the exchange of repertoire and musicians, new networks can be traced between the Opera in Stockholm and other parts of Europe.

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Lenka Křupková – Jiří Kopecký
Olomouc's "Half-year" Provincial Theatre and Its Repertoire

Operational conditions of so-called half-year operatic theatres were determined by a wide range of social-historical factors, including revolutions, wars, conflicts, as well as more regional influences, such as the demolition of urban fortifications, etc. The means by which theatre directors led their institutions and shaped singers' careers and repertoire, were likewise subject to local variables. Critics, the free movement of artistic personnel throughout Habsburg and German theatres, the influx of operetta, financial variables of productions – all of this did not help maintain long-established performance traditions of repertoire operas (e.g., a soprano often filled the role of Fidès in Meyerbeer's Der Prophet). This paper examines such vicissitudes at the opera in Olomouc, which operated from autumn to Easter. It establishes what features were typical for its position and size, viewing it as an example of provincial theatre in Austria, but also highlighting differences and relationships with other regional operas, such as Graz.

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Franco Piperno
«Azione sacra per musica». Freemasonry and the Neapolitan Sacred Dramas Repertory for Lenten Operatic Seasons

In the second half of the 1780s Neapolitan theatres started staging a new kind of operatic repertoire: the «Azione sacra per musica». The subjects of these sacred operas were taken from the Old Testament, with productions taking place in the principal Neapolitan theatres (S. Carlo and Fondo) during the new operatic season of Lent (February–March). The Neapolitan practice of staging sacred dramas (quasi-oratory) in theatres was imported from England, though previous experiments occurred in Florence, where a large English community resided. But in Naples it was the Freemasons who fostered the new repertory for political reasons: Maria Carolina, Queen of Naples, was affiliated with Freemasonry, an institution which she intended to use to help contrast both the Spanish and ecclesiastical powers in the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies. This paper will illustrate how the texts and the music of the Neapolitan sacred dramas could reveal aspects of masonic ideology: a new leading role for women in political and governmental matters, the fragility of despots subdued to the “Great Architect” and their need for the support and advice from religious counsellors able to interpret the Divine Will.

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Clair Rowden
The Sopranos, Parisian style, 1869.

This paper examines a slice of the careers of the French soprano Caroline Miolan Carvalho and Swedish soprano Christine Nilsson in Paris during the period 1867-1875, considering star singers’ career paths, the internationalisation of the operatic circuit and its intersections with domestic production, reputations made and fortunes lost.

The parallel careers of these two singers are thrown into high relief when the Opéra performed Gounod’s Faust in 1869 with Nilsson as Marguerite. Simultaneously, Miolan Carvalho who had created the role in 1859, found herself unemployed due to the bankruptcy of the Théâtre-Lyrique, run by her husband Léon Carvalho, but often bankrolled by the fortunes Miolan Carvalho’s stardom had made. Miolan Carvalho’s old friend and colleague, Emile Perrin, director of the Paris Opéra, came to the rescue, not only putting her back on the capital’s most prestigious musical stage just as Nilsson was about to debut in a role written for Miolan Carvalho, but also buying the Carvalhos’ debt, a large part of which was in Caroline’s name.

Through the examination of press and archival documents (contractual, financial and legal; letters, auction catalogues and registers), this paper will examine how both singers negotiated this encounter and how it, and the breakout of the Franco-Prussian war, immediately affected their careers: Nilsson cemented her fame and fortune on the global stage, while Miolan Carvalho endured a period of hardship before being recrowned at the Paris Opéra in 1875 as Ophélie in Hamlet, a role that Nilsson had created to great acclaim in 1868.

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Cristina Scuderi
Operatic Production System in Eastern Adriatic Theaters during the late Habsburg Empire: Impresari and Networks

This paper discusses some key issues related with the production system of opera in the theaters that overlook the coast of Istria and Dalmatia between 1861 and 1918.

The archival material collected so far from Rijeka to Dubrovnik, through Zadar, Šibenik and Split, allows us to reflect on the identity and activity of the impresari, on the relationships between impresari and directions of theatres, and the management and recruitment of the artistic staff.

Although each of these coastal theatres had its own history, different subsidies and different opera seasons, some efforts were made in creating a network between theatre managers, with the clear aim of saving part of the costs needed for the organization of the seasons.

The progressive Germanization and Slavicization of the area, pursued with no hesitation by Emperor Franz Joseph, did not stop impresari in hiring Italian opera companies for one or more seasons. The companies came from the hinterland, while the musicians were only for a part local.

Can we speak of "cultural resistance" of Italian opera in the territories taken into consideration? After all, the area considered was characterized by a strong cultural mix, at the crossroads of the Slavic, Germanic and Latin world.

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Solveig Serre
The Académie royale de musique under the Ancien Régime: some elements of a political system

In her numerous studies of French opera, Catherine Kintzler showed how this genre fits into the poetic system of the theater classique. In this article, I postulate that the O/opera also fits squarely into a political system. The creation of an "académie de musique" (Paris Opera) dates back to 1669 when the King conferred privileges to Pierre Perrin (in 1672 it became the "Académie royale de musique"). Built on grounds eminently political, the institution originally produced entertainment for the court, specifying the rules of the art and reflecting the glory of the sovereign. Over the course of the eighteenth century, following the "decentralization of pleasures" that now dedicates the triumph of Paris on Versailles, the statutes of the institution evolved: it moved from personal to stage management, first linked to the Paris municipality between 1749 and 1780, then to the "department des Menus-Plaisirs" (until the French Revolution). At the same time, the monarchical state was characterized by a progressive disembodiment of royal power: within the Opera’s repertoire, the aesthetics of incarnation actually devolved to an aesthetics of representation.

Any study of the Académie royale de musique under the Ancien Regime therefore requires taking into account a system of artistic networks in which aesthetic and political elements interact. The purpose of this talk is thus twofold: to trace how this complex form of French opera develops and recomposes on the long time; and to demonstrate how the serious lyric genre testifies to a dual process of institutionalization and formalization of music, on the one hand, and the adaptation of political norms to music on the other.

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Ingeborg Zechner
London’s Italian Opera: A Transnational Venture

Transnational transfer was one of the main characteristics of the Italian opera market in the nineteenth century: operatic works were circulated across national borders and were adapted to distinct local conditions in which performances took place. London, due to its dependency on the import of star singers and works, should be regarded as an important nexus of this international marketplace. This paper examines the networks that existed between the British capital's two competing Italian opera houses, Her Majesty’s Theatre and the Royal Italian Opera House Covent Garden, in the period between 1830 and 1855. Drawing upon various sources, such as correspondence, singers’ contracts, court proceedings, performance statistics, and journal reports, it reveals how the recruitment of singers from Paris and Berlin, which had different legal and political constellations, presented opportunities as well as challenges for Italian opera in London.

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Judit Zsovár
Farinella at the Viennese Kärntnertortheater, 1730-1732

Maria Camati(-Brambilla) arrived in Vienna in 1730 as a twenty-year-old singer, only a year after her debut at the S. Moisé theatre in Venice (in Albinoni’s Filandro, January 1729). Her nickname, Farinella, might refer to a Farinellian vocal agility as well as a high range, and to a preference in his arias, albeit not to that kind of superiority the famous castrato had in comparison to his colleagues. Later she performed in Venice (-1740, and 1747-), Berlin (1741), Vienna (1742-), Graz (1754), and with Giovanni Battista Locatelli’s troupe in St. Petersburg (1757-).

At the ‘Teatro Privilegiato’ next to the Vienna's Kärntnertor, Farinella sang, besides several intermezzi and pasticci, in the operas of the Neapolitan composer Francesco Rinaldi. Fortunately, the scores of Rinaldi’s works – in contrast to the majority of the Kärntnertortheater’s musical materials – have survived and are kept in the Anton-Ulrich-Sammlung in Meiningen. According to these sources, Farinella performed castrato-type coloratura arias as well as lyric gallant movements. Her roles likewise show variety: in Arminio (1732) she embodied the male hero, in Il contrasto delle due regine in Persia (1732) the opponent and intriguer (Barsina), while in Eumene (1730) she played the part of the faithful and true lover (Artemisia). In addition, she took the mother role of Cornelia in the 1731 pasticcio version of Handel’s Giulio Cesare in Egitto.

This paper’s aim is to situate Farinella as a novel vocal phenomenon in order to illuminate the early years of the above-mentioned public opera houses.

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Daniel Brandenburg

Daniel Brandenburg studied Musicology, Ancient Philology and Italian Literature at Bonn University. After a having undertaken a postgraduate reserach fellowship at the German Historical Institute in Rome, he was member of the editorial staff of the Neue Mozart Ausgabe (Stiftung Mozarteum Salzburg) and Research Assistant at the Forschungsinstitut für Musiktheater, Bayreuth University. As Lecturer and Visiting Professor he taught courses at the Universities of Ferrara, Rome, Turin, Vienna, Klagenfurt, Salzburg and Bayreuth. From 2015 to 2018 he investigated the correspondence of Franz and Marianne Pirker („Italian Operisti as Cultural Network“, Salzburg University, funded by the austrian Fond zur Förderung der Wissenschaftlichen Forschung). Presently he is in charge of the Gluck-Briefe-Ausgabe (Edition of Christoph Willibald Gluck’s correspondence, on behalf of the Academy of Science, Mainz).

His main areas of research interests are History of (italian) Opera and Musical Theatre with particular focus on the 18th and 19th century, Opera Business, Staging Opera, Singers, Opera Singing, Opera buffa, travelling Opera Companies and Christoph Willibald Gluck.

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Michael Burden

Michael Burden is Professor in Opera Studies at Oxford University and Chair of the Board of the Faculty of Music; he is also Fellow in Music at New College, where he is Dean. His published research is on aspects of London dance and theatre in the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries. He is currently completing a volume on the staging of opera in London between 1660 and 1860; publications include the five-volumed London Opera Observed 1711-1843, a study of the London years of the soprano Regina Mingotti, a volume edited with Jennifer Thorp – The works of Monsieur Noverre translated from the French: Noverre, his circle, and the English Lettres sur la danse, and a jointly edited volume, Staging History 1740-1840. He is Principal Investigator on the electronic calendar, ‘The London Stage 1800-1844.’ He is Director of Productions of New Chamber Opera.

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Richard Erkens

Richard Erkens studied first at the University of Bayreuth (Theatre Studies, Musicology and German Literature) and later at the Free University, Berlin, where he graduated in 2005 (MA). In 2007 he undertook research fellowships at the German Study Centre in Venice and the German Historical Institute in Rome. He was awarded his PhD at Free University, Berlin (2010) with a thesis on the Italian composer Alberto Franchetti. In 2011 he was assistant lecturer at the Hanover University of Music, Drama and Media and freelance journalist in Berlin. At the Lübeck Theatre he worked as dramatic adviser for opera and concerts as well as vice opera-director from 2011 to 2015. Since then he has been a research associate at the German Historical Institute in Rome, working on a new research project on the role and influence of impresarios in 18th century Italy. Since 2016 he has been assistant lecturer at the Humboldt University in Berlin. His main areas of research interests are History of Opera and Musical Theatre, Musical Dramaturgy, Librettology, Opera Staging, Music Criticism and the Business of Opera.

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Mark Everist

Mark Everist is a Professor of Music at the University of Southampton, where he was Head of Music from 1997-2001, and again from 2006-2010. In 2010, he was appointed Associate Dean (Research) in the Faculty of Humanities and Director of the Humanities Graduate School. He teaches undergraduate courses on the middle ages, the 18th and 19th centuries, and masters courses on research methods and critical practice. Mark Everist's research focuses on the music of western Europe in the period 1150-1330, French 19th-century stage music between the Restoration and the Commune, Mozart, reception theory, and historiography. He is the author of Polyphonic Music in Thirteenth-Century France (1989), French Motets in the Thirteenth Century (1994), Music Drama at the Paris Odéon, 1824-1828 (2002), Giacomo Meyerbeer and Music Drama in Nineteenth-Century Paris (2005), and Mozart's Ghosts: Haunting the Halls of Musical Culture (2012), as well as editor of three volumes of the Magnus Liber Organi for Editions de l'Oiseau-Lyre (2001-2003) and six collections of essays. A recipient of publication prizes from the American Musicological Society in consecutive years (2010 and 2011), he is a fellow of the Academia Europaea, and President of the Royal Musical Association. Mark was elected corresponding member of the American Musicological Society in 2014.

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Karin Hallgren

Karin Hallgren is professor in musicology at Linnaeus University, Sweden. Her research is mainly on Swedish music history in the 19th century, with a special interest for opera in its social context, both regarding performance practice and economic, social and political circumstances. To this research area belongs also studies on the function of opera during the reign of the Bernadotte dynasty in the first half of the 19th century. Recent articles deal with opera in Stockholm in a comparative perspective to other European cities, especially regarding financing and repertoire. Hallgren has participated in the project Swedish Musical Heritage with articles on Swedish composers and has also been an editor of volumes in the Gesamtausgabe of the Swedish composer Franz Berwald.

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Jiří Kopecký

Jiří Kopecký (1978) studied musicology at the Palacký University in Olomouc. He spent the summer term 2000 at the St. Cloud State University in Minnesota. He entered his doctoral studies at the Philosophical Faculty of Masaryk University in Brno in 2002. He studied winter term 2003/2004 at the Martin-Luther Universität Halle-Wittenberg. His dissertation thesis Zdeněk Fibich´s Operas on the libretti by Anežka Schulzová was finished in 2005. Since 2005 he has been an assistant lecturer at the Departement of Musicology of Palacký University. He is the author of five books, and he has given seminars and conferences in Poland, Germany, France, Ireland etc.

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Lenka Křupková

Lenka Křupková (1970) studied piano at the conservatory in Ostrava (1984–1990) and continued her music studies at the Department of Musicology of the Philosophical Faculty of Palacký University (1990–1995, M.A. thesis On the Musico-dramaturgical Structure of Janáček’s Opera Věc Makropulos). She completed her postgraduate studies with her dissertation on The Chamber Works of Vítězslav Novak (2001). At the same faculty she studied journalism (1994–1997). Since 1995 she has been working at the Department of Musicology of Palacký University in Olomouc, where she qualified as a university lecturer (2009), she has also been a head of the department since 2012. Her main areas of research interest are Czech music of the 19th and 20th centuries, particularly the work of Vítězslav Novak and Leoš Janáček, Czech and European chamber music, music theatre, sociology of music and music editing. She has published a number of articles and six books.

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Franco Piperno

Franco Piperno is Professor of Music History at the University of Rome “La Sapienza” and Director of the centre “Sapienza CREA – Nuovo Teatro Ateneo”. His principal research fields are: Music at the Italian Renaissance Courts; Music and poetry in Cinquecento Italy; The interpretation of the Italian instrumental music of the 17th Century; Opera production and dramaturgy in the 18th Century; Sources and institutions of the music in Rome during the 18th Century; He is member of the editorial board of the Journal "Recercare" and principal editor of the book series “Musicalia”. Recent publications are Una "grandissima amistà". Poesia e musica nell'età del Petrarchismo. Roma, Bulzoni 2017 and La Bibbia all’opera. Drammi sacri in Italia dal tardo Settecento al Nabucco, Roma, NeoClassica 2018.

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Clair Rowden

Clair Rowden is Reader and Deputy Head of School in the School of Music, Cardiff University. Her research deals with the cultural history of nineteenth-century France, and she has published on the business and critical reception of opera, stage production, dance and caricature in La Revue de musicologie, Cambridge Opera Journal, Music in Art, and Franco-British Studies. Her book Republican Morality and Catholic Tradition at the Opera: Massenet’s Hérodiade and Thaïs was published in 2004, the edited volume Performing Salome, Revealing Stories (Ashgate/Routledge) in 2013, and the co-edited volume Musical Theatre in Europe 1830-1945 with Brepols in 2017. She regularly writes programme notes for the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Wexford Festival Opera, the Salzburg Festival and articles for Opera magazine. Forthcoming publications include the book Opera and Parody in Paris, 1860-1900 (Brepols, 2020), and the co-edited volume Carmen Abroad (also 2020), whose associated website can be consulted at CarmenAbroad.org.

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Cristina Scuderi

Cristina Scuderi is a postdoctoral lecturer and researcher at the University of Graz. After her PhD and diplomas in organ, harpsichord and electronic music, she worked at the Universities of Fribourg and Stuttgart, collaborating with the Universities of Udine, Florence and Padua, and the Teatro La Fenice in Venice. She has also been active as a freelance journalist. In her work, she has been supported and received research grants and scholarships from a wide variety of organisations including the Ministero degli Affari Esteri, DAAD, SAIA, Fondazione Rinascimento Digitale, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche and the Bogliasco Foundation. Since 2005, she has been co-managing the International Composition Competition “Città di Udine” and the “Contemporanea” New Music Festival. Her current project is focused on reconstructing the production system of opera in Eastern Adriatic theatres in the period between 1861 and 1918, with special consideration given to the network between impresari, theatre directors, singers, musicians and editors.

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Solveig Serre

Solveig Serre (CNRS, CESR/CMBV) is a historian and musicologist and full-time CNRS researcher in the team CMBV (Centre de musique baroque de Versailles) in CESR Centre d’études supérieures de la Renaissance, UMR 7323). Her research deals with the history of French cultural institutions (Parisian lyric institutions under the Ancien Régime) as well as the history of the punk scene in France since 1976 (ANR research project PIND: punk is not dead, a history of the punk scene in France, 1976-2016). Among her publications: L’Opéra de Paris (1749-1791): politique culturelle à l’époque des Lumières (2010, Paris, éditions du CNRS) and La scène punk en France (1976- 2016): quarante ans d’histoire (with Luc Robène, special issue Volume!, 2016).

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Ingeborg Zechner

Ingeborg Zechner studied Musicology and Business Administration at the University of Graz and at the University of Music and Performing Arts Graz. In 2014 she received her PhD in Historical Musicology with a dissertation about London’s Italian opera business in the nineteenth century at the University of Graz. The dissertation was published in 2017, both as German version at Böhlau (Das englische Geschäft mit der Nachtigall) as well as an open-access English version (The English Trade in Nightingales). Since 2015 she is working at the Gluck-research center at the University of Salzburg, where she is currently preparing a critical edition of ballet music composed by Gluck. In the academic year 2018/19 Zechner is a Fulbright Visiting Scholar at Syracuse University with a research project about the composer Franz Waxman. She taught courses at the Universities of Graz, Salzburg and Vienna.

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Judit Zsovár

Judit Zsovár is a soprano and musicologist, contributor to the project of the Austrian Academy of Sciences on the Viennese Kärntnertortheater, conducted by Andrea Sommer-Mathis; and assists Reinhard Strohm with the Halle Handel Edition's upcoming Scipione.

She graduated in musicology from the Liszt Academy Budapest (2006), studied singing with Marek Rzepka as well as coach Stephen Hopkins (Vienna State Opera), and participated in masterclasses of Roberta Invernizzi, Júlia Hamari, Krisztina Laki, Malcolm Bilson, and Luca Pianca. Judit was member of the Erkel Chamber Opera; appeared at the Vienna Konzerthaus (Mozarteum Orchestra Salzburg/Bolton), the Nádor Hall, and the Liszt Chamber Hall (Budapest).

With a dissertation about Anna Maria Strada’s vocal art she earned her doctorate in 2017. Judit also investigates bel canto techniques in the mirror of soprano sfogato. She presented her singing and research in Salzburg, London, Bern, Helsinki, and Budapest; published i.a. in the Händel-Jahrbuch.

Judit held the Handel Institute Research- and Conference Awards, the DAAD- and the Zoltán Kodály Scholarships, and that of the Hungarian State.